Thursday, December 29, 2011

Little Princes - Review

Paperback: 320 pages
Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks (December 27, 2011)


An astonishing testament to true courage, the transformative power of love, and the ability of one man to make a real difference.

In search of adventure, twenty-nine-year-old Conor Grennan embarked on a yearlong journey around the globe, beginning with a three-month stint volunteering at an orphanage in civil war–torn Nepal. But a shocking truth would forever change his life: these rambunctious, resilient children were not orphans at all but had been taken from their families by child traffickers who falsely promised to keep them safe from war before abandoning them in the teeming chaos of Kathmandu. For Conor, what started as a footloose ramble became a dangerous, dedicated mission to unite youngsters he had grown to love with the parents they had been stolen from—a breathtaking adventure, as Conor risked everything in the treacherous Nepalese mountains to bring the children home.



Conor Grennan, author of the memoir Little Princes, spent eight years at the EastWest Institute (EWI), both in Prague and the EU Office in Brussels, where he served as Deputy Director for the Security and Governance Program.

At the East/West Institute, Conor developed and managed a wide variety of projects focusing on issues such as peace and reconciliation in the Balkans, community development in Central Eastern Europe, and harmonizing anti-trafficking policy at the highest levels government in the European Union and the former Yugoslavia.

Conor left EWI in 2004 to travel the world and volunteer in Nepal. He would eventually return to Nepal and found Next Generation Nepal, an organization dedicated to reconnecting trafficked children with their families and combating the root causes of child trafficking in rural villages in Nepal. He was based in the capital of Kathmandu until September 2007 where he was the Executive Director of Next Generation Nepal.

Conor now serves on the Board of Next Generation Nepal, together with his wife, Liz. He is a 2010 graduate of the NYU Stern School of Business, where he was the President of the Student Body. He lives in Connecticut with his wife and son, Finn, and a soon-to-be baby girl.

Connect with Conor on Facebook and Twitter. Also visit his website and his organization, Next Generation Nepal.


My Thoughts
Rarely do I finish a book and then find myself thinking about it days later. Little Princes is one of those books. It is funny, exciting and will make you think.

Conor Grennan volunteered to work at an orphanage in Nepal on a lark, a way to impress friends, and make his plans to see the world seem less trivial. There were second thoughts when he first saw the orphanage. For someone who had never had any real interaction with children this had to seem like a daunting task. But before long the volunteer who was to help and teach found himself learning from the children he had been sent to work with.

Once I started reading Little Princes I couldn't put it down. Conor Grennan's conversational writing style makes this a very easy read. Following along as Conor changes from a casual volunteer to someone who is willing to make a major commitment for a cause is fascinating. Little does he realize the adventure and danger his decision will bring.

Conor Grennan has made a commitment to reunite these children with their parents. This story is not over. Be sure to visit Next Generation Nepal for more information.

I recommend this book to all of you, this is one you must read.







I received a copy of this book from the publisher for review purposes. I was not compensated for my review, all opinions are my own.

10 comments:

  1. Morning Ms J...
    Mom recently saw a program about Nepal. She was quite shocked at their lack of bare necessities.
    Katmandu is about the only city anywhere close to have 21st technology. This is a very powerful book
    Hugs Madi and Mom

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  2. an amazing story and God bless him for helping these children. human trafficing is rampant these days with the majority being children and women.

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  3. You got me. I did want to tell you how much I appreciate that you put links to these books on your sidebar. It makes my life so much easier when I get to the bookstore! :-)

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  4. Sounds like an awesome book. Thanks for the review. I am adding it to my reading list.

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  5. This is so interesting that I went on Amazon and looked it up, it has an extremely high rating there. I am going to get it. Either as a paperback or on my iPad. I loved the little video!

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  6. looks like a really excellent read!

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  7. This sounds like a book that will stick with you for a long time. I'm glad you enjoyed it! Thanks for being a part of the tour.

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  8. That sounds like a book I would love. I enjoy true stories the best. Thank you for making me aware of it. It goes on my library list.

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  9. This book I must read.Seems to be very interesting from your description.Great that you do these book reviews it helps us find nice books to read.

    Happy new year Judy! Have a wonderful year ahead.

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